Training/Practice

IMG_5755WOD - “Triangle Couplet”15 – 10 – 6 rep rounds: Thrusters (165#/115#) Bar Muscle-Ups

Time Domain:  8-12 min. Scale BMU: Have some, do what you can.  When they go away: Ring Muscle Ups Box Jump Muscles Ups

Don't have Chest-to-Bar or Regular Pullups or Ring Dips: 8 Chest-to-Bar Pullups + 7 Dips (5 + 5, 3 + 3) Regular Pullups + Banded Dips Ring Rows + Box Dips

For most of us this was a great day for practicing and training.  These weights are heavy - mentally, thrusters are a challenge to continue to string together under load.  Many people have a bar muscle up or 2, but to face these rep numbers it seemed easier to think one should just get through the workout doing pullups and dips.  However, as we know with Double Unders, doing the scale just to get through the workout and get a good time does not improve or succeed the weak skill.  You just need to accept that this day is a training day.  Repeated attempts at the piece you struggle with.  Thousands of mindful reps of doing that thing will be the only thing that will make it better.  So, many of us just put our heads down for 20-25 minutes of practice and let the clock go for today.  There are workouts that are intended to be pushed and we want to see new PR's and there are workouts that are for you as individual to decide that it's time to just focus on development of skill and accept that it's going to be difficult in order to make it easier for other workouts down the road.  That's what this one was for me today.  Get those bar muscle-ups dialed in!  Get more comfortable under heavy Thrusters!

To be clear, it is not the repetitions alone that make the difference.  You need lots of repetitions where correct behaviors are specified, where information on results are readily available and where small improvements are positively reinforced.  Stay mindful to your positions.  How things feel when the rep isn't completed well compared to when it is.  Listen to coach's feedback on what they see and what change could help.  Then try more reps.

IMG_5737 IMG_5709 IMG_5695 Welcome to Alex, visiting us from CF OKC (OK)!

Know the Difference: Training vs. Testing vs. Competing

by Larry Palazzolo

There’s a difference between training, testing and competing. In CrossFit that line has gotten blurred, especially by those newer to it who are still in the honeymoon phase. I’ve been around this stuff for the better part of a decade so for me the honeymoon is over. I know what to expect. I know how most workouts are going to feel. I know how to game them. But most importantly, I know the difference between training, testing and competing.

Training

is your day-to-day sessions (metcons, strength, skill work, etc). You want to get a good workout, achieve the desired stimulus, work on the things you need to work on, and then go home and recover. You work hard, but you don’t need to keep peeling yourself off the floor each and every training session.

IMG_5741 IMG_5739

Testing

is doing a benchmark workout (or something in a similar vein) for the 2nd, 3rd, or 50th time in the hopes of improving on your previous best effort (which hopefully wasn’t done yesterday). This would also apply to strength lifts where you might do max reps of a weight at, or near, your 1-rep max. Pulling your 1-rep max for 2 or 3 reps means you had a good day, it’s not a PR. There’s a difference.

IMG_5716 IMG_5715 IMG_5713

Competing

is something completely different. Whether it is a competition like the CrossFit Open, some locally held event with multiple workouts in a day, or the couple times a year when you do a CrossFit, Powerlifting, or Olympic total, those are the moments when the world fades out to a muted blur, you go to that dark place and find out what kind of man or woman you truly are. That is competing. That’s when a true max effort occurs. Most people only have maybe 12 of those efforts in them per year.

Keep your training hard but fun (because if it’s not fun, why do it?). Use your testing as a barometer of your training. And leave your competition days knowing you put forth a true max effort.

You can’t max out every day (unless you’re on drugs). Sometimes less is more.

IMG_5704 IMG_5699

Daily WODLisa RayComment